Taking Risks, the French Kiss of Entrepreneurship

Erin Lynch
4 min readSep 21, 2018

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I am generally a risk averse person…or at least I was up until about three years ago. Then I got serious about business, about running a studio, and about my need to work for myself. If you want a crash course in risk taking, the most direct route has to be by walking away from a secure job and hanging your entrepreneurship shingle out there for the world to see. If you’re considering working for yourself, plan on those decisions being a gateway to some of the most fear inspiring moments of your life.

Risk as Necessity

Risk is unfortunately, or fortunately depending on how you choose to look at it, part of becoming and being an entrepreneur. Risk takes you to the some of the highest points of apprehension and the lowest points of fear as you step completely outside your comfort zone on nothing more than a whim. Yet, when that risk results in success, it can be one of the most rewarding (and addicting) experiences you’ll come to know as a business owner.

Taking risks means opening yourself up to both success and failure. As I mentioned, when risk leads to success it can be close to intoxicating — failure, unfortunately, results in quite the opposite. But failure is a necessary part of the entrepreneurship process. You can’t have one without the other. And, in my experience, failure can provide the springboard to future success. Let’s look at a case”ish” study.

Entrepreneurship in Multiples

My first two attempts at starting a design studio were utter failures. My first studio, lovingly called Hybrid Studios, was going to be one part design studio, one part art house. I spent hundreds of hours planning things out in my head as to how this creative endeavor would be the ultimate career vehicle — the penultimate creative endeavor. I wrote out business plans, got a new shiny computer, designed logos and business cards for the business. I even went through the steps of renting a small, minimalist space in Portland, Oregon’s swanky Pearl area. It was where I would manage my creative take over of the world. I took the risk, and I was primed for success.

It took all of four weeks for me to realize something was drastically wrong. I had no clients, I had no leads, I had no idea what I was…

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Erin Lynch

Designer, writer, pixel articulator, educator, and neurodivergent human. Subscribe to my newsletter, Past Tense, at erinlynch.substack.com